New Music Friday: June 7 2019

Emily Treadgold #1, New 9 Tracks Leave a Comment

MUNA IS BACK AND WE COULD NOT BE HAPPIER!!!

They described the song on Instagram, "Number one fan is a song about recognizing the negative voices in your head and learning to speak back to them. Making this record forced each of us, in the best way, to look at our own issues around self-love and self-worth. We’ve come to believe that, just as we can all be our own biggest haters, we can also decide to be our own biggest fans.

It’s been an incredibly liberating process, learning to love ourselves this way. In this culture, we are almost taught to look to other people to fill up some void in ourselves.

What happens when we accept that we are already whole and perfectly lovable in this moment.

We become out own icons. We become unbreakable and unbuyable.

We save the world."

ROZES just dropped this gorgeous song and we cannot get enough.

Making an evolution from her electronic-tinged stylings, ROZES embraces her roots and performs at a solo piano, belting out a hard-hitting and heartfelt, soulful hook. Composed at Alicia Keys’ all-female writing camp She Is The Music  ROZES worked with all women from co-writers, to producer, to engineer #GIRLPOWER!

The iconic K. Flay is back with her new song "Sister."

The Illinois born-and-raised artist speaks on what her interpretation of sisterhood is and her inspiration behind the song: “Being a sister isn’t about gender or DNA. It’s about unselfconscious love. About saying I'M HERE, I LOVE YOU, IT’S OK TO BE YOURSELF, and hearing those words echoed back. Not because you asked for them, but because they’re true. Girls are sisters and boys are sisters. Dads are sisters to their sons. Mothers sisters to their mothers too.”

Dedicating the song to her own step-brother and sister, she continues, “I’ve come to understand that family is created. Family is a verb. It’s something you build day by day, sometimes in the hot sun and sometimes when everything is going wrong.”

Anna Dellaria is back with "At My Worst" a song about being vulnerable.
She said, "Too often,  we allow our flaws and vulnerabilities to justify settling for less or expecting less from others.  One day, I was inspired to write something for myself and others on the days when we're tired of compromising and meeting other people's standards, just because we've believed for so long that we're unworthy of more.  I had a moment of realizing, "Wtf! The reason this person is 'drawn' to me is because of the chaos inside of me that allows for those beautiful parts to exist!"  
I hope this song enables everybody to be their boldest selves and celebrate their quirks or imperfections as the tools that allow us to be stronger, better and so much more.  Most importantly, I hope the song inspires people to grab a friend or drink (or both!), and yell "Want me at my best? Then take me At My Worst" and vow to never settle for less, and to celebrate their "crazy" or "weird" sides."

Merci Raines is witch-pop perfection.

She told us, "This song was pretty much a culmination of my experiences growing up in the south. There’s so many things I love about southern culture, but there’s also a lot of judgement and focus on appearances. The idea that good always comes looking one way, and bad another. That’s rarely the reality though. Sometimes the worst things come in the prettiest, most presentable packages and vice versa."

Gia’s creative and personal diversity exceeds the bounds of electronic pop, indie, and dance. “Feel It” highlights her sultry vocals as they careen over beckoning production. She draws in breathy verses before exhaling a climactic hook that’s impossible NOT to feel!

Gia explains, “To me, this is one of those perfect moments where the sound of the song sounds like the feeling in the lyrics. It’s slinky and seductive. It sort of creeps up on you. You can dance to it, but it’s not aggressive. It’s sensual and fun—just like the beginning of a heavy crush.”

Illicit Ghost is back with her haunting vocals but this time she's reclaiming her power in “Precious." The song is cinematic yet stripped down, teetering on the edge of a blend between Lana Del Rey and The Velvet Underground, with jolting and freakish violin playing thrown into the mix. The vocal could be interpreted as a cry for help, but in a world that only she could create and destroy, you don’t need to save her.

Deep dives...

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