90’s Kids Throwing It Back With “Slow Motion”

Emily Treadgold #4, Premiere

90's Kids just dropped a new song titled "Slow Motion" and it's giving us all the nostalgia feels. We chatted with the band about the inspo behind the song and the biggest challenge they've faced so far.

How did y’all get started as a band?

 90's Kids: Matt, Robby and myself (Corey) all went to college together at Ohio University. I'd been writing stuff for 90'S KIDS for about a year before I even knew the band was going to be a thing, but when the three of us got together to start building an idea for the project, things just started clicking. We came up with the idea behind 90'S KIDS and from there, we all just put every ounce of belief we had into it. We played our first show in February of 2018 and things have just continued to grow ever since.

What was a major turning point in your career?

 90's Kids: Selling out our first ever headliner show this past October was an experience that, I think, took us to the next level as a band. We had just brought in Jordan as our drummer and 4th member, and we put on this huge production. It was crazy seeing a sold out room, full of people singing along to our music. We hadn't even been a band for a year at that point. So it was really gratifying and humbling to sell out a show in front of our hometown Columbus crowd and just play our hearts out.

Tell me about “Slow Motion” what’s the story behind it?

  90's Kids: The idea for "Slow Motion" actually came from a movie I was watching on a sleepless night. I turned on this movie "Hot Summer Nights" because it looked like it had this cool, '80s/'90s nostalgic vibe to it. The movie absolutely blew me away, and did such a good job capturing that youthful, eclectic '90s romance and rebellion kind of feel to it. This one particular scene where the guy and the girl drive out into a corn field and make out in their car, I just thought it was done so well. It sparked the idea of that passionate, rebellious love that we experience when we're teenagers. From there, the song just kind of wrote itself. The production and arrangement of the song were actually incredibly easy for us to write, because everything about the song just felt right from the get-go.

I love all the nostalgia in your sound, how did you decide on that?

 90's Kids: We tend to think the whole idea behind being a 90's kid is that you miss what life used to be like, before technology, when things were simpler. Like, don't you miss just running around the neighborhood with your friends, being outside, being a real person? Society has kind of turned people into attention-seeking, social media addicted people, at times. But our generation, kids like us who were born in that timeframe of the 90's, kind of long for that simplicity and freedom that we had when we were kids. That's why we love nostalgia so much and incorporate it into our sound - we're just trying to relate to people who feel the way we do.

What’s been the biggest challenge in your career?

  90's Kids: The hardest thing is putting yourself out there, spending your life trying to create music that other people can resonate with, and never knowing if you'll really "make it." It's a scary thing, to take a leap of faith like that when you're an aspiring artist. But I think it's also a motivating factor as well. If you believe enough in your music, it's worth a shot.

What’s your best piece of advice for young musicians? 

  90's Kids: Don't rush it. Don't release anything you don't love. Your music is your baby, and if you're putting your baby in front of the whole world, you should be as proud of it as you possibly can be. Take the time to perfect your creation before you put it out - it's better to build something you really love, than to look back and regret all the little things you could have done to make it better.


  • Emily Treadgold

    Music aficionado and editor-in-chief at The New Nine. I'm most at home at festivals and concerts. I would love to start a band of all Kanye covers all on keys. I'm a dedicated Jack White fan and when I saw him in concert it changed my life. I'd never seen someone so passionate about music and preserving its history. Every project he does I just worship. Follow me on Twitter and Insta: @etreadgold