Slow Magic Remains A Mystery

Emily Treadgold #3, Features Leave a Comment

Slow Magic is a bit of a mystery, he wears a multicolored animal mask during his show and keeps pretty quiet about his life but he delivers a crazy performance and makes the most infectious music.

How did you get started in music?

SM: I got started when I was five, I guess, as far as playing music. My dad was musical so I just kind of watched him and just wanted to do that.

And tell me about kind of developing your sound and kind of how you started doing this professionally.

SM: Yeah. I was in bands a lot with people in school, and then when they were kind of like-- I was more into it, I guess I was weird about it and they were more casual. So I was like, "I'm just going to start my own one-man band," and did a lot of stuff, learned how to use the computer to make music and just kind of-- I'm here now.

Yeah. How do you feel about when people say that it's not real music?

SM: I guess I have some drums up there so people that need to see, I'm like, "I'm playing some drums." That's the easiest instrument to see and know that someone's playing.

But don't you think that it really takes a lot of talent to just engineer all that?

SM: Yeah. It's kind of like-- obviously, a lot of the work is done in the bedroom or in the office or whatever, so it's like watching a movie. All the work that went into it, you can't see it. You see the actors that-- there's just so much stuff that went into it. It's kind of like producing music.

And then don't you think that's like part of the way music develops, is people put technology into it?

SM: Yeah. I definitely like to-- just like imagining the song. And you don't have an orchestra, or I don't, so I just can make it on the computer. Obviously, I love to do that thing where it's all real instruments and all that. I think it would work with my music, it's just a lot to coordinate.

What kind of do you want your listeners to feel when they listen to your music? What's the message?

SM: I just want them to feel happy and-- I don't know. I think about beauty in the world and people, that's what inspires me to make music. Hopefully, they feel that and feel some sort of freedom, I guess, to just exist.

Freedom to exist. And what would be your best piece of advice for a young musician?

SM: Be nice to everyone because why not?

I like that. Be nice to everyone. How does it feel to be at Coachella this year?

SM: Oh, it feels crazy. I feel like I'd never imagined playing here. Just playing here is like a dream come true. It's almost not real. I feel like it's a dream.

Would you consider that a career-defining moment?

SM: Yeah. I mean, I was wondering about it. I was wondering if I was like the most successful musician who used to wear a cardboard box on my face. 

Slow Magic is a bit of a mystery, he wears a multicolored animal mask during his show and keeps pretty quiet about his life but he delivers a crazy performance and makes the most infectious music.

How did you get started in music?

I got started when I was five, I guess, as far as playing music. My dad was musical so I just kind of watched him and just wanted to do that.

And tell me about kind of developing your sound and kind of how you started doing this professionally.

Yeah. I was in bands a lot with people in school, and then when they were kind of like-- I was more into it, I guess I was weird about it and they were more casual. So I was like, "I'm just going to start my own one-man band," and did a lot of stuff, learned how to use the computer to make music and just kind of-- I'm here now.

Yeah. How do you feel about when people say that it's not real music?

I guess I have some drums up there so people that need to see, I'm like, "I'm playing some drums." That's the easiest instrument to see and know that someone's playing.

But don't you think that it really takes a lot of talent to just engineer all that?

Yeah. It's kind of like-- obviously, a lot of the work is done in the bedroom or in the office or whatever, so it's like watching a movie. All the work that went into it, you can't see it. You see the actors that-- there's just so much stuff that went into it. It's kind of like producing music.

And then don't you think that's like part of the way music develops, is people put technology into it?

Yeah. I definitely like to-- just like imagining the song. And you don't have an orchestra, or I don't, so I just can make it on the computer. Obviously, I love to do that thing where it's all real instruments and all that. I think it would work with my music, it's just a lot to coordinate.

What kind of do you want your listeners to feel when they listen to your music? What's the message?

I just want them to feel happy and-- I don't know. I think about beauty in the world and people, that's what inspires me to make music. Hopefully, they feel that and feel some sort of freedom, I guess, to just exist.

Freedom to exist. And what would be your best piece of advice for a young musician?

Be nice to everyone because why not?

That's good. I like that. Be nice to everyone. How does it feel to be at Coachella this year?

Oh, it feels crazy. I feel like I'd never imagined playing here. Just playing here is like a dream come true. It's almost not real. I feel like it's a dream.

Would you consider that a career-defining moment?

Yeah. After this, I'm done. Yeah. I mean, I was wondering about it. I was wondering if I was like the most successful musician who used to wear a cardboard box on my face. It used to be my mask was made out of cardboard, so it's better now.

  • Emily Treadgold

    Music aficionado and editor-in-chief at The New Nine. I'm most at home at festivals and concerts. I would love to start a band of all Kanye covers all on keys. I'm a dedicated Jack White fan and when I saw him in concert it changed my life. I'd never seen someone so passionate about music and preserving its history. Every project he does I just worship. Follow me on Twitter and Insta: @etreadgold

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